Home » Freemason - Myths and Symbols by Arius De Winter
Freemason - Myths and Symbols Arius De Winter

Freemason - Myths and Symbols

Arius De Winter

Published
ISBN :
Kindle Edition
399 pages
Enter the sum

 About the Book 

As a Former Mason, I believe it time the writing and history of the Masons be told to all.When I first contemplated the composition of a work on this subject, a distinguished friend and Brother, whose opinion I much respect, and with whose advice IMoreAs a Former Mason, I believe it time the writing and history of the Masons be told to all.When I first contemplated the composition of a work on this subject, a distinguished friend and Brother, whose opinion I much respect, and with whose advice I am always anxious to comply, unless for the most satisfactory reasons, suggested the expediency of collecting the decisions of all Grand Masters, Grand Lodges, and other Masonic authorities upon every subject of Masonic Law, and of presenting them, without commentary, to the fraternity.But a brief examination of this method, led me to perceive that I would be thus constructing simply a digest of decrees, many of which would probably be the results of inexperience, of prejudice, or of erroneous views of the Masonic system, and from which the authors themselves have, in repeated instances, subsequently receded—for Grand Masters and Grand Lodges, although entitled to great respect, are not infallible—and I could not, conscientiously, have consented to assist, without any qualifying remark, in the extension and perpetuation of edicts and opinions, which, however high the authority from which they emanated, I did not believe to be in accordance with the principles of Masonic jurisprudence.Another inconvenience which would have attended the adoption of such a method is, that the decisions of different Grand Lodges and Grand Masters are sometimes entirely contradictory on the same points of Masonic Law. The decree of one jurisdiction, on any particular question, will often be found at variance with that of another, while a third will differ from both. The consulter of a work, embracing within its pages such distracting judgments, unexplained by commentary, would be in doubt as to which decision he should adopt, so that coming to the inspection with the desire of solving a legal question, he would be constrained to close the volume, in utter despair of extracting truth or information from so confused a mass of contradictions.There are certain fundamental laws of the Institution, concerning which there never has been any dispute, and which have come down to us with all the sanctions of antiquity, and universal acceptation. In announcing these, I have not always thought it necessary to defend their justice, or to assign a reason for their enactment.Whatever may be the verdict passed upon my labors by my Brethren, I trust that some clemency will be extended to the errors into which I may have fallen, for the sake of the object which I have had in view: that, namely, of presenting to the Craft an elementary work, that might enable every Mason to know his rights, and to learn his duties.In conclusion, one must naturally make up ones own mind but I for one would not care to join such an organization. I find the Masons as a whole, untrustworthy and self promoting. This is not an organization of charitable requirements at all. On first glance, it would appear that the organization assist those in need, cares for those requiring care, but look closer and you will find little of this unless it in someway promotes the organization.During my study of Freemasonry I found the only true way to see and experience the cult would be to join it and therefore I did. The result is this series of book on the subject, you need not agree with a single word of their content, I leave that to each individual reader to decide.