Home » Serbian Cuisine: Paprika, Turkish Coffee, Pork Rind, Slivovitz, Goulash, Pilaf, Pig Slaughter, Rakia, Esnica, Polenta, Boza, Sarma, Kol by Source Wikipedia
Serbian Cuisine: Paprika, Turkish Coffee, Pork Rind, Slivovitz, Goulash, Pilaf, Pig Slaughter, Rakia, Esnica, Polenta, Boza, Sarma, Kol Source Wikipedia

Serbian Cuisine: Paprika, Turkish Coffee, Pork Rind, Slivovitz, Goulash, Pilaf, Pig Slaughter, Rakia, Esnica, Polenta, Boza, Sarma, Kol

Source Wikipedia

Published September 4th 2011
ISBN : 9781157662075
Paperback
64 pages
Enter the sum

 About the Book 

Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pages: 62. Chapters: Paprika, Turkish coffee, Pork rind, Slivovitz, Goulash, Pilaf, Pig slaughter, Rakia, ?esnica,MorePlease note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. Pages: 62. Chapters: Paprika, Turkish coffee, Pork rind, Slivovitz, Goulash, Pilaf, Pig slaughter, Rakia, ?esnica, Polenta, Boza, Sarma, Koliva, Soda bread, Beer in Serbia, Nut roll, Ajvar, Smetana, ?evapi, Stuffed peppers, Fishermans Soup, Kaymak, P rk lt, Palatschinke, Kifli, Tursu, Rostiljijada, Knjaz Milo AD, Shopska salad, ?varci, Popara, Simit, Caciocavallo, Pihtije, Punjena paprika, Pekmez, Knedle, Ka?amak, ?uve?, Pelinkovac, Kara?or?eva nicla, Yufka, Tulumba, Slatko, Poga?a, Krafne, Gibanica, Pin?ur, Roasted piglet, Snow White salad, Pasulj, Proja, Yaprak, Urnebes, Kru kovac, U tipci, Mu?kalica, Sremski Sir, Sremska kobasica, Tufahije, Djevrek, Serbian salad, Podvarak, Komovica, Crepulja. Excerpt: Turkish coffee is a method of preparing coffee in which finely powdered roast coffee beans are boiled in a pot (cezve), optionally with sugar, before being served into a cup where the dregs settle. This method of serving coffee is common throughout the Middle East, North Africa, Caucasus, and the Balkans. While the word coffee itself is driven from Arabic (Qahwah ), the coffeehouse culture was highly developed in the former Ottoman world, and this was the dominant style of preparation. Coffee has its origins in Ethiopia and Yemen as well as the South Western parts of Saudi Arabia The word coffee in every language is derived directly or indirectly from the Arabic word ( Qahwah ). By the late 15th and early 16th century, it had spread to Cairo and Mecca. The Ottoman chronicler ?brahim Pe evi reports the opening of the first coffeehouse in Istanbul: Various legends involving its introduction at a Kiva Han in 1475 are reported on web sites, but with no documentation. Coffee has affected Turkish culture so much that the Turkish word for breakfast, kahvalt? literally means before coffee (kahve means coffee and alt? under...